Groundbreaking £21m Glasgow Hospice opens

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The Prince and Princess of Wales Hospice in Glasgow’s Bellahouston Park, has been officially opened by Eva Bolander, Lord Provost of Glasgow, and Lady Clark, chairwoman of Arnold Clark.

Designed by international design practice Ryder Architecture, the £21 million scheme is based on the Sengetun model (meaning bed courtyard in Swedish).

This patient orientated model makes it easier for patients to identify, orientate themselves and feel comfortable within a smaller group.

The original hospice in Carlton Place was renowned for providing exceptional levels of care but was not designed for young adults, whilst the new hospice provides improved palliative care for young adults over 16. The scheme includes family bedrooms and large kitchens to maximise the time that families can spend together, in addition to lounges, a sensory room, spa bathrooms and therapy rooms.

Alastair Forbes, architectural director at Ryder, said: “We are just really proud of the building, it’s a fantastic achievement for the Prince and Princess of Wales Hospice and the project team. It’s based on a different layout – a Sengetun model – which is the first time this Scandinavian ward layout has been realised in the UK.

“The whole design has been focused around dignity for patients and their families, and the volunteers and staff here, and the key driver through the design was patient choice. That patient has a choice and control over their environment from wherever they are sitting around the hospice.”

Rhona Baillie, chief executive of The Prince & Princess of Wales Hospice, said: “This is a fantastic day for the thousands of people who have supported the Brick by Brick Appeal over the past six years, for our staff and volunteers and, most importantly, for the patients and families we care for.

“This wonderful new building, located in a beautiful setting in one of Glasgow’s most loved parks, will allow us to provide the very highest standards of palliative care.”

The scheme will welcome the first patients in early November.