Funding boost for local WWII project

Rachel Kelly,  project coordinator
Rachel Kelly, project coordinator

Lost Strathclyde Heritage Group has received a National Lottery grant of £52,800 for an exciting heritage project, ‘Patterton WWII: A POW Camp and its Neighbours’.

Made possible by money raised by National Lottery players, the project focuses on Camp 660, a WWII prisoner of war camp, and village of Patterton.

This intergenerational oral history project will capture the history of the camp and its impact on the local people between 1939 and the late-1950s.

Around 50 local volunteers, including many young people, will receive filming, research and/or oral history training and interview 30+ respondents who lived in or near Patterton during WWII and the post-war era of rationing and austerity. Volunteers will work with Dr Sue Morrison, a professional oral historian, to produce audio clips from the oral history archive, and work with a film maker to film interviews and create short videos.

These digital products will be used in project outputs, exhibitions, presentations and the project website.

The project offers opportunities for cross-generational learning activities and exploration of experiences through reminiscence events, talks and film screenings.

It will also evoke memories of the lighter side of life from which respondents share recipes, and dress and make-up tips from the era, and local dancers will work with volunteers young and old to recreate WWII-themed tea dances. In addition, the project will produce a unique oral history booklet packed with personal memories, photographs and a timeline of Patterton Camp 660.

Commenting on the award, Iris Larkins, chairman, said: “We are thrilled to have received this support thanks to National Lottery players and are confident the project will promote and instil pride in this important aspect of East Renfrewshire’s wartime heritage.”

Lucy Casot, head of HLF Scotland, said: “Thanks to National Lottery players, HLF is able to help communities learn about and take pride in their local heritage as well as training in new skills. Learning about history can be rewarding, fascinating and fun, and ‘Patterton WWII: A POW Camp and its Neighbours’ is no exception.”