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The real sound of progress?

The Lost Prophets

The Lost Prophets

 

IT HAS been more than a decade since the Lostprophets burst on to the scene with their debut album Thefakesoundofprogress, which has now gone platinum.

Their first single Shinobi vs Dragon Ninja propelled them from little known Welsh alternative rockers to the mainstream, somewhere they have remained ever since — so much so that the band have recently been collaborating with Earthquake singer Labrynth.

But now the band are going back to their roots, playing hard rock in venues across the UK.

On Wednesday, the band — who recently won Kerrang! Magazine’s prestigious Classic Songwriters award -— perform at the Glasgow O2 academy.

This comes just weeks after the release of their fifth studio album Weapons.

The diversity of the band was shown in the production of the album, which was done half in Norfolk and half in Los Angeles.

Through four previous albums – 2000’s Thefakesoundofprogress, 2004’s Start Something, 2006’s number one Liberation Transmission and last year’s The Betrayed – the sextet have risen from the clubs of England to the stages of Wembley .

In the process they have chalked up more than a dozen top 40 singles and have sold two million albums worldwide.

But does this success come naturally to a band whose members have known each other since their school days in Pontypridd, South Wales?

“We’ve all known each other since we were five, pretty much”, lead singer Ian Watkins said. “We went to the same school, lived opposite each other.

”We started the band because we were mates and we all loved playing music together, and then it became about devising a plan to hang out together and play music forever, avoiding any responsibilitity”.

Bassist Stuart Richardson added: “Over the past 15 years, we’ve just done our thing and we’re lucky that we’ve written music that we’ve loved and other people have loved it too. It sounds really clichéd and trite, but it’s true”.

n To book tickets for Wednesday’s 02 Academy gig, phone 0844 477 2000.

 

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