Your view: moment of Murray magic

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THE SOUTHSIDE came to a standstill despite the sunny weather last weekend as Andy Murray competed in his second Wimbledon final.

Much to the delight of the whole country and beyond, the Scot lifted the trophy after a thrilling duel against world number one Novak 
Djokovic.

The win ended a 77-year wait for a British winner in the men’s singles competition at Wimbledon, following Fred Perry’s 1936 victory at the All England Club.

Giffnock Tennis Club, which hosts its Junior amd Senior Open this week, has already noticed a spike in interest.

President Duncan Campell said: “Our head coach Stephanie Norris said there were another 20 youngsters today compared with last week.”

Tennis Scotland chief executive David Marshal added:“I’m sure there are thousands of people of all ages who were so inspired by Andy’s performance on Sunday that they’ll pick up a racquet and get on court.”

Meanwhile, the Scottish government’s sports agency will capitalise on the success of Andy Murray with a £5.8 million investment in improving tennis facilities and widening access to the 
sport.

We took to the streets this week to find out if southsiders were caught in the wave of Murray mania.

Michael Bissett (57) said: “I have never liked him so I didn’t even bother watching the final.

Fair play to him for winning, but he just comes across as really miserable to I have no interest in him whatsoever. I can’t seem to get past his boring personality.”

Isiah Lee (18) commented: “I didn’t actually watch the final (I was at church) but I was really pleased he won — he’s a good player. I was far more interested in the rugby this weekend than the tennis though, it was great to see the Lions win in Australia.”

Raisah Din (22) said: “I was at a big family gathering on Sunday. Normally, we wouldn’t watch TV during a party but this was a special occasion and everybody was cheering on Andy. It’s the most excited my family have been about sport.”

James Todd (73) added: “I watched it at The Laurieston Bar. The whole place erupted when he won — very unusual for a game of tennis. Normally it’s only racing or football that gets punters that excited. It was a great moment in sport.”