New community resource for Pollokshaws

Rob Wardell tries out the new Pollokshaws cycle station.
Rob Wardell tries out the new Pollokshaws cycle station.

A NEW community resource has been opened in Pollokshaws which will encourage people to get on their bikes.

The old railway building at Pollokshaws West railway station has been refurbished and emerged as a cycle repair station.

05/08/13'POLLOKSHAWS WEST STATION'Rob Wardell tries out the new Pollokshaws Cycle Station with Garry Molloy (right) and Francois Sreeves (left)

05/08/13'POLLOKSHAWS WEST STATION'Rob Wardell tries out the new Pollokshaws Cycle Station with Garry Molloy (right) and Francois Sreeves (left)

The building, part of Glasgow’s oldest, working train station, had fallen into such a bad state that it had to be boarded up.

But now, due to hard work and commitment by the Glasgow Building Preservation Trust, it has been transformed into a hub where cycling enthusiasts can gather as it will provide free cycle repairs to children, low-cost bike hire and sales, training and events.

There will also be a secure bike lock-up facility, a bike repair workshop, lockers, shower and changing room.

Earlier this week, cycling, professional star Rab Wardell met with volunteers at the station for a sneak peek of the centre and to allow him to try out the new facilities.

It has taken four years for the Glasgow Building Preservation Trust to raise the funds to save the Catoegory B-listed building, which will be run by South West Community Cycles.

Pollokshaws West railway station was first opened in 1848 and, by 1998, the station’s old waiting rooms and ticket office were replaced by newer facilities leaving parts of the old building derelict and its attractive, Victorian interior stripped back to an empty shell.

But now the building is set to be a centrepiece for the community, serving hot food and drink.

As well as supporting green travel, the eco-friendly building itself is completely sustainable, thanks to a wood pellet stove boiler funded by the GreenEnergy Trust’s donation.

The boiler blends seemlesly with the traditional architecture of the Victorian building and now provides heating and hot water for its visitors.

Gill Stewart, from the Glasgow Building and Preservation Trust, said: “We are committed to saving and restoring historic buildings so that they can take on a new life and once again play an important role within local communities.

“We are delighted to finally re-open the doors of the station and bring local people together with this much needed community cycling hub.

“By installing the biomass boiler we will keep the station’s running costs low and promote the environmental ethos at the heart of the project.”