Masterchef’s Gary gets stuck in

Gary MacLean cooking it up for some of the day services patients. Pic courtesy of: Martin Shields
Gary MacLean cooking it up for some of the day services patients. Pic courtesy of: Martin Shields

BBC TV’s Masterchef: The Professionals winner Gary Maclean took time out from his hectic schedule to serve lunch to patients at The Prince & Princess of Wales Hospice.

The senior chef lecturer at City of Glasgow College rolled his sleeves up to help staff in the hospice’s Carlton Place kitchens prepare food, before then serving up a treat to the day care patients.

“My wife has long been a great supporter of The Prince & Princess of Wales Hospice so to be asked to help prepare lunch for patients is a huge honour.

Taking part in, and winning MasterChef: The Professionals was an incredible experience which is now giving me great opportunities to meet some quite remarkable people and is allowing me the opportunity to cook in some very special venues,” said Gary, who has worked at the college for 13 years.

And since his win he is fast becoming a well-known face on television screens in the city after making regular appearances as a guest chef on STV Glasgow.

Gary won the prestigious title after a final which included making a very specialdish for 28 Michelin-starred chefs.

He spectacularly beat 47 other professional chefs over seven weeks of cooking during his time on the competition.

After Maclean was announced as the winner, judge Marcus Wareing said: “He’s a major talent who’s lived the dream and he’s a gentleman of the kitchen.”

“Gary made everyone’s day by coming in to see us,” said Rhona Baillie, chief executive of Glasgow’s Hospice. “We’re all big fans of the show and were rooting for him to win. It was a fantastic achievement. He was a huge hit with the patients, we really appreciated him taking the time to visit.”

Buy a Brick, the latest phase of the hospice’s Brick by Brick Appeal to build a new home for Glasgow’s Hospice in Bellahouston Park, launched recently.

To support the work of the hospice and to buy a brick by donating £5, text BRICK to 70660 or make a donation online at www.ppwh.org.uk/donate.

Work has now begun on site at Bellahouston Park and patients are expected to start moving over to the new building in 2018. The new hospice will be one of the first in the country to transition young people from children’s to adult services.