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Calais cycle

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AN ACCOUNTANT from Muirend is adding another daunting charity challenge to his resume.

Fitness enthusiast Stuart Macdougall (29) previously completed an eight million metre row for the the Yorkhill Children’s Foundation in 2011, but this, he says, is the challenge of his life.

Stuart, along with friends Bryan Marshall and Andy Russell, will cycle in excess of 1,000 miles from Calais to Barcelona over the course of 11 days from June 7 this year.

Some stages will require cycles as long as 220km and another will encompass one of the toughest mountain stages of the tour de France, the Alps de Huez.

The trio will begin their journey on June 8, in aid of the sick kids hospital in Yorkhill.

Stuart has a special connection to the hospital, for in 1990, at the age of seven, his life was saved by its doctors and nurses after he was admitted just a month before Christmas.

He told The Extra: “I was struck with kidney and liver failure, unable to even bend my legs.

“However, thanks to the incredible effort of the staff during my three weeks there I was discharged before Christmas and have not looked back since.

“What has kept me motivated throughout training is just how fortunate I am to be able to do this, and the knowledge of the fantastic work that everyone associated with Yorkhill does for sick children and their families.

“I would like to say a massive thank you to all our friends and family who have already donated.”

The group have already raised more than £2,000. To support Stuart’s efforts, visit www.justgiving.com/Cycle-calais2Barcelona.

Meanwhile, 25-year-old Johnny Leitch is supporting cancer charity Marie Curie with his charity cycle.

The Newton Mearns man will travel 1,949 miles around Perthshire on his bike.

He told The Extra: “Unfortunately I know too many people whose lives have been shattered by this illness and I hope I can make a difference.”

To support Johnny, visit http://www.justgiving.com/Johnny-Leitch.

 

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