Hospital is grateful for £5k donation

Smile of Arran Trust with Glasgow Children's Hospital Charity team.
Smile of Arran Trust with Glasgow Children's Hospital Charity team.

A charity set up in honour of a Scottish teenager who tragically died from a brain tumour has donated £5,000 to help young patients being treated in Glasgow.

The Smile of Arran Trust made the donation to Glasgow Children’s Hospital Charity – with the money going towards a new neurosurgical endoscope at the hospital.

Arran Tosh sadly passed away three years ago at the age of 13. As Arran was an active and inspirational young fundraiser prior to his diagnosis, his family created the trust to continue his legacy and celebrate his life, helping causes close to their heart.

Originally from Dumfries, the Tosh family travel from their home in England each year for a special charity walk around the Isle of Arran. This year’s walk has just been completed, with Arran’s mum and dad Alison and Steve being joined by sister Abbie and four of Arran’s friends.

Prior to the walk, the family visited the Royal Hospital for Children in Glasgow – where they placed a specially engraved leaf on the remembrance tree.

Kirsten Sinclair, director of fundraising, Glasgow Children’s Hospital Charity, said: “The neurosurgical endoscope is the first of its kind at a children’s hospital in Europe. Since its introduction it has been making a huge difference to young patients suffering from serious brain conditions.

“We are hugely grateful to the Smile of Arran Trust for their support. We know how much it means to the Tosh family to help children and teenagers, especially those battling a similar condition to Arran. It was an honour to bring them to the hospital’s Sanctuary, where they placed a remembrance leaf as a permanent tribute to their son.”

Alison Tosh, chairperson, the Smile of Arran Trust, said: “We were honoured to meet the team from Glasgow Children’s Hospital Charity, for their support to our charity and to be shown around some of the incredible facilities that support children’s recovery whilst in hospital. Our donation is a small appreciation of the incredible work that is done by that charity and we look forward to our continued support for GCHC in the future.”

Glasgow Children’s Hospital Charity recently launched its Schiehallion Appeal, which aims to raise £500,000 to help young cancer patients receive potentially life-saving treatment.

For more information on Glasgow Children’s Hospital Charity and the Schiehallion Appeal, visit www.glasgowchildrenshospitalcharity.org.