Launch of new mental health programme

See Me, the programme to end Mental Health discrimination in workplaces today launched new figures at Central Station in association with Network Rail.   ( l-r) Judith Robertson , Director See Me Scotland; Leanne McKillop, See Me Volunteer; David Lewis , Lewis Creative Consultants; Lisa Cohen, See Me Programme Manager. See Me  Pic : Marc Turner / PFM
See Me, the programme to end Mental Health discrimination in workplaces today launched new figures at Central Station in association with Network Rail. ( l-r) Judith Robertson , Director See Me Scotland; Leanne McKillop, See Me Volunteer; David Lewis , Lewis Creative Consultants; Lisa Cohen, See Me Programme Manager. See Me Pic : Marc Turner / PFM

Almost half of Scottish workers believe that fellow members of staff wouldn’t speak out about mental health issues for fear of discrimination.

That was one of the findings of a YouGov survey of 1,165 Scottish workers commissioned by See Me, the national programme to put a stop to mental health discrimination.

It found that some 45 per cent of folk disagreed that someone in their work would be well supported by management trained to help and advise people with mental health issues.

Additionally, 31 per cent said that they had personally experienced a mental health problem.

Now it is launching a new campaign, working alongside employers to improve understanding of mental health, hopefully allowing people to feel safe enough to speak out if they are struggling.

See Me claim the figures show that some people have serious concerns when it comes to talking about their mental health.

In order to alter this perception, See Me is encouraging businesses in Glasgow to join its See Me in Work programme, along with launching a hard-hitting campaign, The Power of Okay.

It will include a poem, set to appear at cinemas, about the isolation people feel when they can’t speak out at work.

It is based upon the experiences of its author, Ian Greenhill, one of the founders of the company Something Something.

Ian said: “I personally think it’s important to start the discussion about mental health and the simple start-off point of ‘okay’ seemed really powerful.

“We just want a discussion to be started rather than people being scared of saying the wrong thing and just not saying anything.

“If we all start out at that base level of human kindness, I think the world — and the workplace — would be a lot better.”

Judith Robertson, See Me programme director, said “You don’t have to be an expert to speak about mental health, just asking someone if they are okay can be a powerful thing.

“It is crucial that leadership comes from the top.”