Concerns raised over use of toxic pesticides

Knotweed can even break through tarmacadam surfaces.
Knotweed can even break through tarmacadam surfaces.

A campaign has been launched to ban a potentially harmful weedkiller from the streets and parks of East Renfrewshire.

The petition, run on the 38 Degrees webite by concerned resident Karin French, was brought to our attention by Beverley Brown who was shocked when she learnt of the harm glyphosates can do.

Council admit to using glyphosate weedkiller on Japanese Knotweed

Council admit to using glyphosate weedkiller on Japanese Knotweed

Several cities have banned the pesticide, including Edinburgh and Aberdeen.

The World Health Organisation has said these chemicals, called glyphosate, “probably cause cancer”.

Karin said: “The use of toxic glyphosate chemicals in weedkillers has already been banned or restricted in eight countries. We are extremely concerned that our community, including young children and dogs, and our precious wildlife are being routinely exposed to glyphosate that the World Health Organisation states is ‘probably carcinogenic’.”

East Ren Council replied saying: “We do use this weed killer in our green spaces. For example to control stubborn colonies of the fiercely invasive non-native species Japanese knotweed, like the one near the main entrance to Rouken Glen Park. Elsewhere in the Park and, indeed, in many of our other public places we try to minimise the use of weed killers.

“Many of our shrub beds are mulched with bark, so only need spot treatment from time-to-time, and we have looked at alternative methods of weed control including hot water spraying and hot foam treatment, as well as manual controls. “Glyphosate-based weed killers are licensed by the Chemicals Regulation Directorate, which also provides guidance on their use. When used under the proper advisement, which we follow, they are safe for humans, animals and the environment.”

To view the petition: http://tinyurl.com/goxyeft