Award for flood plan

Glasgow city council leader Gordon Matheson at the official opening of the White Cart Flood Prevention Scheme with children from Battlefield primary last year.
Glasgow city council leader Gordon Matheson at the official opening of the White Cart Flood Prevention Scheme with children from Battlefield primary last year.

GLASGOW city council has won an award for flood prevention in the southside.

The award was given for the council’s White Cart Water Flood Prevention Scheme at the Waterways Renaissance Awards ceremony in Birmingham.

The scheme was opened last October and protects 1,750 homes along the river from risk of flooding.

The scheme came first in the top category of Flood Risk Management.

As part of the design, there were major enhancements made for Glasgow’s biodiversity and wildlife habitats with the creation of new woodland, scrub, species-rich wet grasslands, shallow scrapes and ponds along with other artificial habitats.

The competition organisers said: “The completed scheme was the first in Scotland to seek a solution that was not constrained by local authority boundaries.

“It also sought to maximise the positive environmental outcomes rather than simply carry out minimal mitigation”.

In all, 29 projects were recognised at the event.

Bailie Liz Cameron, executive member for jobs and the economy at Glasgow city council, said: “This is a fantastic achievement for the White Cart Flood Prevention Scheme and those who worked so hard to make it a reality.

“I am delighted that the scheme has been recognised in this way.

“Glasgow was very ambitious for this project.

“The White Cart Flood Prevention Scheme is not just about great engineering, at its heart is a regeneration project.

“The scheme will allow future economic development to take place in the area along the bank of the White Cart due to the significant enhancements and environmental improvements carried out”.

Usually a shallow river, the Cart has been prone to flash flooding in the past.

As little as 12 hours of rain can cause water levels to rise by six metres and can turn the river into a raging torrent as it gathers momentum downstream towards the suburbs.

Since 1908 there have been 20 floods caused by relatively minor storms and the scheme has already been tested and found to be a success following storms in February 2011, November 2011 and January 2012.