Extra Comment: A step back in time

Wayne Hemingway and friends announce their part in this year's Merchant City Festival in true vintage style.
Wayne Hemingway and friends announce their part in this year's Merchant City Festival in true vintage style.

CUPCAKES and doughnuts are all the rage.

Anyone even slightly tech savvy will have noticed a trend on social media sites recently – a ever-growing feed retro-tinted, rosy-hued snaps of cakes and Krispy Kremes galore.

Photographer-Ian Georgeson-07921 567360'Traffic chaos on the first day of trading at Krispy Kreme, Edinburgh, customers cue to buy there doughnuts.'Pic:  Top six

Photographer-Ian Georgeson-07921 567360'Traffic chaos on the first day of trading at Krispy Kreme, Edinburgh, customers cue to buy there doughnuts.'Pic: Top six

Of course, it might have something to do with the latter opening a shop in Edinburgh – and the thousands flocking to Hermiston Gait to queue for a box of sugary goodness.

Unfortunately, this reporter couldn’t possibly comment on how they taste, despite numerous hints to friends and family that a jammy surprise would earn them brownie (or should that be doughnut?) points.

So why, you ask, am I blabbering on about decadent desserts that I haven’t tried – and making you hungry in the process?

The point – reached in a roundabout way – is that the recent obsession with cupcakes and the like are symptomatic of a fascination with all things vintage.

Whether it’s forties and fifties fashion making its way down the catwalks (not to mention the sixties hitting this summer) or a generation of girls donning pinnies and breaking out the cake moulds, we’ve fallen in love with nostalgic versions of the past.

Glasgow’s vintage scene has long been flourishing with retro clothes emporiums galore and regular chances to doll up at the vintage-themed Club Noir (incidentally, the world’s biggest burlesque club night...take that New York and Paris).

But the city’s status as a style mecca is on the up this year, as London designer Wayne Hemingway has announced that he’s bringing his Vintage Festival to Glasgow this summer.

The event has been touring for five years, but July 27-28 marks the first Scottish stop as part of the Merchant City Festival.

Glasgow vintage lovers can expect a marketplace, fashion shows, makeover salons, craft workshops and clubbing events, all centred around the apt Old Fruitmarket venue.

It’s hoped that it will draw upwards of 100,000 – more than the Merchant City fest has ever drawn on its own – and the buzz surrounding it suggests that this figure is more than achievable.

Fingers crossed anyway, because if it proves a success, Vintage Glasgow will be back for at least the next three years.

So what can festival-goers expect? Well, the focus is on the 1920s to the 1980s – a timescale bound to make the odd reveller feel old, having lived through some those decades the first time.

The spotlight is on all things culture: music, film, fashion, art, dance, food, design, and most of the events are free – although tickets have been released for others, and may fly fast.

Hemingway has promised a focus on the city – both past and present – specifically, commenting: “Glasgow’s culture is still pretty underrated throughout the rest of Britain. It’s such a vibrant European city and it really makes sense for us to do the event when the Merchant City Festival is on so we can take advantage of that.”

I couldn’t agree more.

The arrival of the Vintage Festival is a welcome boost for an ever-expanding calendar of events across Glasgow, and I believe that we will – and should – welcome it with open arms.

Edinburgh, you can keep your Krispy Kremes – because we west coasters have some vintage attire to fit into come July.