1984: more than just a prediction

Orwell's uncompromising book has become a stage hit.
Orwell's uncompromising book has become a stage hit.

Some 30 years ago, I remember, some of the howling press were shouting about Orwell’s 1984 prediction’s not coming true.

Well, the book was not a Nostradamus-type revelation — it was written in 1948 and Orwell simply switched the last two digits around.

But what a story about a dystopian society where your every move may be being watched.

It’s the story of one man’s decision to stand up to authority and make his own decisions. Winston Smith is a worker whose every move is monitored by the state of Oceania on Airstrip One (previously Great Britain).

Winston works for the Ministry of Truth — rewriting history to conform to current party truths — but unbeknowns to the party (or so he believes) he begins to keep a secret diary.

He also begins a doomed love affair with a fellow party worker who wishes nothing more than to bring corruption to Big Brother’s reality.

The couple think they have found a confederate in O’Brien — an inner party member who provides them with with a proscribed book by supposed traitor Emmanuel Goldstein.

But can O’Brien be trusted? Orwell’s nightmarish vision of the future has crept into our language — and not only as the names for silly games shows such as Big Brother and Room 101.

1984 plays at the Citizens Theatre from tomorrow (Fri) with ticket prices varying depending on when you wish to go.

Tomorrow evening’s show is sold out as is Thrusday’s.